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Say You Were In A Junk Shop...


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48 members have voted

  1. 1. ?

    • Pocket the ******, then buy or do not buy the dresser at your discretion. You basically 'found' this, it's yours.
      11
    • Pocket the ******, but buy the dresser either way. That way, it's not stealing since you would've wound up with it anyway.
      7
    • Put it back where it was, then buy the dresser hoping that they don't notice. That way, you're buying the entire unit as it existed prior to the discovery of the gold piece. You just got lucky.
      25
    • Notify the store owner about the gold piece. However they react is up to them.
      5


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... and in that junk/antique shop, you were looking at a primitive dresser. Handmade, probably from the south, rustic materials (rough hewn and painted pine boards), iron nails. It's old. Being a diligent type, you take out the drawers to examine the structural integrity of the frame and asses how much repair/stabilization work you've got to do to get the dresser in daily-use condition. Bottom drawer comes out, you look inside the frame and notice a coin stuck inside one of the rear frame members, covered in dust. It's a $5 Gold Piece from the 1880's. Not a super rare date, but with gold being at what it is and whatever numismatic value it has, we're talking a coin worth $400 or $500, which is about the cost of the dresser. How do you react? Poll.

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karma
do you believe in the easter bunny too? grow up peter pan. count chocula. it's just like when you're little and you wanna believe santa claus is alive. fuckin santa claus is dead man.
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They are selling the dresser, not the coin. If I found a penny under the dresser on the floor, would I turn it in to the shop?
how is that a good analogy? a penny has no value. and this justification is nonsense. either you're okay with stealing it or not. don't try to rationalize it with nonsense.
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how is that a good analogy? a penny has no value. and this justification is nonsense. either you're okay with stealing it or not. don't try to rationalize it with nonsense.
Wait; how is it NOT a good analogy? You think it's stealing to take the penny off the floor, then? Or is it the POTENTIAL VALUE that makes it different?
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They are selling the dresser, not the coin. If I found a penny under the dresser on the floor, would I turn it in to the shop?
Often the contents of a container are sold along with the container. A penny on the floor would not be considered part of the contents of the dresser. If they are unaware of the contents of the dresser, that is their own negligence.
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Tools and Their Usage Explained---How Many Do You Recognize? DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so thatit smacks you in the chest and flings your soft drink can across the room, denting the freshly-painted project that you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it. WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light.Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned callusesfrom fingers in about the timeit takes you to say, "Oh sh--!" SKIL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make wooden studs too short. PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimesused in the creation of blood-blisters. BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly usedto convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs. HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built onthe Ouija board principle...It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course,the more dismal your future becomes. VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completelyround off bolt heads. If nothing else is available,they can also be used to transfer intense welding heatto the palm of your hand. OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely forlighting various flammable objects in your shopon fire. Also handy for igniting thegrease inside the wheel hub out of which youwant to remove a bearing race. TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonlyused to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity. HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering anautomobile to the ground after you have installed your newbrake shoes, trapping the jack handlefirmly under the bumper. BAND SAW: A large stationary power saw primarilyused by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet intosmaller pieces that more easily fitinto the trash can after you cut on the inside of theline instead of the outside edge. TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing themaximum tensile strength of everything you forgot todisconnect. PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used tostab the vacuum seals under lids or foropening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans andsplashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, asthe name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads. STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER: A tool foropening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert commonslotted screws into non-removable screws andbutchering your palms.. PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple themetal surrounding that clip or bracket youneeded to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part. HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to make hoses too short. HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon ofwar, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind ofdivining rod to locate the most expensive partsadjacent to the object we are trying to hit. UTILITY KNIFE: Used to open and slice throughthe contents of cardboard cartons delivered to yourfront door; works particularly well oncontents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids inplastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, andrubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use. SON-OF-A-BITCH TOOL: (A personal favorite!)Any handy tool that you grab andthrow across the garage while yelling"Son of a BITCH!" at the top of your lungs. It isalso, most often, the next tool that you will need.

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