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Advice On Chip Count Targets At Mtts


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Anyone care to share thoughts/insights on "how to set chip count targets at various blind levels at MTTs"?I'm trying to look a bit deeping into my game and I'm convinced I'm not setting targets correctly. Reading DN's blogs about the Bellagio tourny got me thinking about how to set the targets pre-game, then adjusting based on "where I'm at now" (that is, I may want to have 5x starting chip count by the 8th level in order to feel "in contention" but if I'm 3x by then, I'll need to re-adjust "how to get to the next level")Thanks for any thoughts you care to share (did a quick search here and on 2+2 but didn't find anything super useful)-al

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My answer would be the same as it usually is...read Harringon on Hold Em. Your question cannot be answered without specifics, the book gives so many examples that it answers your question for most tournament structures.

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My advice is that, if you force yourself to reach a certain chip stack, it's easy to lose chips instead of attaining them. If you feel that you need to win two hands out of the next ten, and you get dealt 2 7 off for the next ten hands, you probably wont reach that goal.I feel that it's a good idea to be aware of what the average chip stack is, and what your stack is in relation to the big blind or M (the cost per round of ten hands). The boards lit with info at tournaments usually tell how much time is left in the level, how many players are left, and what the average chip stack is. If you've got 1 1/2x or 2x the average stack, you can choose to play more hands, if your table is tight, or kick back, protect your stack, and wait for the best starting hands if your table is loose.It's also important to be aware of the stack sizes for the rest of the players at your table. Short stacks usually fold or are all in. Medium stacks are usually the most defensive. If you and player A at your table are the big stacks of the tournament, you may want to avoid that player unless you're dealt a premium hand and hit the flop hard. You can't get knocked out of a tournament unless you're all in against a bigger stack.I'm sure that a lot of books like Phil Gordon's Little Green Book or Harrington's books can give you an idea where you need to be at different stages of tournaments.

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Thanks for the reply (as well as the previous poster pointing to M...)Yeah, I was actually thinking more in the early rounds of play rather than the later rounds... That is, I'm often finding myself about mid tourney (half the field eliminated) and with a low enough M (either in Harrington's "Red Zone" or in the lower "Yellow Zone") that I'm relying on luck. To counter this, I've started playing more agressively in the early game to build a bigger stack (the thinking being that larger variance isn't as devestating early on...) So, to try to track myself, I've begun setting targets for some of the early stages. To reasonable affect, but I'm wondering if anyone else has additional insights.(and yeah, I'm not looking for the "grand formula" nor am I looking to adhere to these as gospel ("hey, I'm short, and next hand I need to double up, so "all in in the dark!")... I'm just looking to see if others set these types of targets or not (looks like not?))I haven't read the Little Green Book, bt Harrington does a grat job of walking you through an MTT, but doens't seem to give guidance on adjusting play (aside from basing your play on your "M")thanks-al

My advice is that, if you force yourself to reach a certain chip stack, it's easy to lose chips instead of attaining them. If you feel that you need to win two hands out of the next ten, and you get dealt 2 7 off for the next ten hands, you probably wont reach that goal.I feel that it's a good idea to be aware of what the average chip stack is, and what your stack is in relation to the big blind or M (the cost per round of ten hands). The boards lit with info at tournaments usually tell how much time is left in the level, how many players are left, and what the average chip stack is. If you've got 1 1/2x or 2x the average stack, you can choose to play more hands, if your table is tight, or kick back, protect your stack, and wait for the best starting hands if your table is loose.It's also important to be aware of the stack sizes for the rest of the players at your table. Short stacks usually fold or are all in. Medium stacks are usually the most defensive. If you and player A at your table are the big stacks of the tournament, you may want to avoid that player unless you're dealt a premium hand and hit the flop hard. You can't get knocked out of a tournament unless you're all in against a bigger stack.I'm sure that a lot of books like Phil Gordon's Little Green Book or Harrington's books can give you an idea where you need to be at different stages of tournaments.
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Thanks for the reply (as well as the previous poster pointing to M...) To counter this, I've started playing more agressively in the early game to build a bigger stack (the thinking being that larger variance isn't as devestating early on...)
Bingo!
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