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Low suited connecters


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Stop playing 23s.Stop calling raises with it.Stop doing anything but throwing it in the muck.
Right.And 2-4s, 3-4s, 4-5s,3-5s...they're garbage.
what about 52s.... ive flopped 2 straight flushes with it in the bb... ;-)
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After reading his response, he made some interesting points. I'm actually in agreement with most of what he said. But, what we all seem to focus on are the straight and flush possibilities here. The real power came from the two 2's that flopped. That's just one of the beautiful things about this "junk" hand. Why would you play a hand like 2,3 suited? For exactly the reason that often comes up. It's almost impossible to put someone on that hand. It's hard not to get married to Aces on a flop, turn and river of that texture. There don't seem to be any scare cards. The only likely hands that I would be afraid of is Ace 2 suited, or 34, (I think the flop was 2,2,5). In general, when you're first starting out, stick to solid hands. But once you do have a "feel" for the game. Which LITERALLY can take years. Take Awful's advice, and mine to some degree, and switch it up. No-limit is a people game, the cards are just a piece of the personality.

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Think you all for your input in the post i put raised a dollar and what i meant was a unit or $2. Second we where in a casino and I had a little more than the raiser but not as much as the rest of the callers. And last I would have never put him on aa w/ his raise he had big slick and kkand raised 5x bb w/ those hands and everytime he had raised small in early postion before he would fold @ the first bet to. I was just hoping topick it up after the flop.

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The only reason to play low suited connectors and other weak hands is to take advantage of implied odds. ie - you want to hit a big hand that your opponent won't see and take as much of their stack as possible.The best result in this case is always a straight, as it easy to see if you have the nuts and the board is usually 'looking safe'Trips and flushes are good, we'll all take them if we can get them :wink: but the action can slow down with the boards that make these hands (and you rarely have the nuts...)Therefore you are looking for the straight first with the backup of a flush or trips.As Awful pointed out, 23s makes a poor straight - and rarely. The lowest hand you should think of is 45s as you can make 3 times as many nut straights.The most important point though is that suited connectors are still weak hands and you need big implied odds. Therefore I will call a raise with suited connectors if I have position (an absolute must for drawing hands in NL) and the raise is about 5% or less of both my stack and my opponents. Risk without proportional reward is always a bad investment...So to answer you question - get out of there with 23. Suited or not its rubbish.If it was 45s or better the question would be - how big isthe raise compared to your 2 stacks? (I'm assuming its a typo and it was a $10 raise as you can't raise $1 in 1/2). If the raise is small compared to both then feel free to get in and mix it up!It is a lot of fun to crack Aces with a 56 and put your opponent on tilt :D

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I usually would call being in position. I would even call a raise, Pot odds. If 4 other people called a raise out of position chances are good that they all had pretty legit hands. If my read is correct then I would assume that alot of high cards are out. Making me feel the flop would be in my favor. I could be wrong about this but that is how i play that hand in that position.

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