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Hell no, where would I get a giant hornet from plus I'm not nuts.

It's just the entire concept of 'flat screen TV' as being relevant to anything anymore.   People still say "flat screen TV" with implied context as though this were 2001 and they cost $5K.

I don't think acceptance of equality has anything to do with it. Rome had no such illusions, they believed in the superiority of races and even in the superiority of family blood lines. Rome was force

 

Yeah, I don't need to be reading this stuff and I really don't need to be reading the BG link that says IT'S SPREADING!

 

 

A pandemic is one of the worst case scenarios that people who like to horde stuff "just in case" have on "their" list.

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Milk Smugglers Top Heroin Courier Arrests in Hong Kong

 

 

 

For border officials in Hong Kong, baby formula trumps heroin.

 

Since the former British colony on March 1 restricted travelers to two 2-pound cans each, a syndicate has been cracked and more people have been arrested for smuggling milk powder than were detained all of last year for carrying heroin.

 

 

Mainland China’s demand for formula made overseas has been fueled by distrust of locally made food because of product- safety scandals that included the deaths of at least six babies in 2008 after melamine was added to milk. The U.K. and New Zealand are among countries that restricted milk sales as bulk purchases of brands such as Danone’s Aptamil and Mead Johnson Nutrition Co. (MJN)’s Enfamil caused shortages.

 

“Most of them only have one child, and the child is the most important thing in their life,” James Roy, a Shanghai- based analyst China Market Research Group, said of Chinese parents, most of whom are subject to the government’s one-child policy. “They want to be extra careful.”

 

Article Continued At Link

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It isn't so much that China is corrupt as much that it's simply systematic that wealth and power are tied, and that the power is in the hands of a distinct ruling class. The U.S. is fighting corruption, thinking it is holding them back. Really, it is the prevention of corruption that is holding them back. Things like the LIBOR scandal wouldn't be a problem in China because the same thing that required secret (inefficient) behind the back dealings would simply be systematic in China. This would severely increase efficiencies among the largest corporations in the U.S. So income inequality would explode, but overall wealth would increase.

 

I'm not suggesting that 'should' happen - I wouldn't argue that China's system is more ethical or 'better' than the United States'. But anyone arguing for smaller government in the United States should mentally prepare themselves for a day when China is unquestionably a political, economic and military power with greater strength than them, and hope that the Chinese will continue with their history of not seeking to significantly expand their empire.

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It isn't so much that China is corrupt as much that it's simply systematic that wealth and power are tied, and that the power is in the hands of a distinct ruling class. The U.S. is fighting corruption, thinking it is holding them back. Really, it is the prevention of corruption that is holding them back. Things like the LIBOR scandal wouldn't be a problem in China because the same thing that required secret (inefficient) behind the back dealings would simply be systematic in China. This would severely increase efficiencies among the largest corporations in the U.S. So income inequality would explode, but overall wealth would increase.

 

I'm not suggesting that 'should' happen - I wouldn't argue that China's system is more ethical or 'better' than the United States'. But anyone arguing for smaller government in the United States should mentally prepare themselves for a day when China is unquestionably a political, economic and military power with greater strength than them, and hope that the Chinese will continue with their history of not seeking to significantly expand their empire.

 

LOL

 

No China is massively corrupt.

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LOL

 

No China is massively corrupt.

 

To be clear, I'm saying that it is so corrupt that the corruption is expected and part of normal business there. The extreme and deep levels of corruption, understood by all parties, actually contributes to more efficient operations than if people had to be trying to hide it all the time like in the U.S. No question that China is corrupt to an extreme degree compared to any mature North American or European economy.

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To be clear, I'm saying that it is so corrupt that the corruption is expected and part of normal business there. The extreme and deep levels of corruption, understood by all parties, actually contributes to more efficient operations than if people had to be trying to hide it all the time like in the U.S. No question that China is corrupt to an extreme degree compared to any mature North American or European economy.

 

The corruption totally makes the economy run far worse than it otherwise would. It's the opposite of efficient.

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The corruption totally makes the economy run far worse than it otherwise would. It's the opposite of efficient.

 

You think it has more net good than net bad? I mean, the most efficient would be if you eliminated it altogether, but if we accept that as impossible, do you not think a system where the biggest players in the economy get to openly contribute (effectively, creating a new type of market) is better than one where honesty/inaction is punished since the corrupt usually do get their way?

 

As an analogy, do you think the LIBOR situation would have been better or worse if it was openly known that members of the major banks simply made requests as to what the rate would be, rather than it being supposedly calculated on market decisions, with some corruption thrown in.

 

I don't deny that everything I'm suggesting is worse from an ethical standpoint, and worse in terms of human effect, since China is not exactly the model of income equality and fairness, I'm only arguing in terms of pure economic efficiencies. I guess the arguments against it would be the same reasons against Communism - if you did 'allow' for corruption, then some would simply seek to corrupt the corruption; there are some people that are never satisfied unless they are #1, and there is no #2.

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Sorry Danny but you don't really understand what's going on in China.

 

The corruption is known but not out in the open and is in every aspect of society.

 

So what you're saying is the corruption is widespread and known to everyone. Which is exactly what I'm saying. Of course it's not out in the open - if it was, it wouldn't be corruption, it would just be the rules.

 

Do you think if the government cracked down on corruption (and, ummm, were less corrupt themselves?) - resulting in it still taking place, but in a less predictable fashion, to a lesser degree and with the occasional arrest - would that make the economy run more or less smoothly?

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