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Bizzarre Prayer Rituals Of Muslims Must Be Accomodated


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Always reminds me of some science fiction book I read long ago about a group of people who go back in time and use the constitution to provide them with the 'right' to destroy the constitution.

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So, essentially your threshold for creating a new thread is, "Muslim person complains."Then, you call the idea of a Muslim person praying "Bizzarre." (I mean, all prayer is pretty bizzarre, but you should equivalently be calling Christian prayer bizzarre).Also, I'm not sure what the "Saudi Arabia" part means, but I'm guessing your logic is, "Saudia Arabia is bad to Christianity, so therefore we're doing Muslims a FAVOR buy not expelling them on sight."Why don't you wait for a court or whatever to make a decision first. Otherwise, it would seem that you're scanning random news stories, picking up anything vaguely against Muslims, and starting threads about them. But that, of course, couldn't be the case, it'd be too sad.

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http://www.militarytimes.com/forum/showthr...-“Human-Rights”Following the lead of Saudi Arabia, which goes out of its way to accommodate christians in all their public institutions, Muslims here are only asking to be treated the same.Is a SW really necessary here
Bizarre rituals? They want to pray in a room without crosses. Wow, how bizarre. Oh, and they're being denied the right to form a Muslim student association. Love to see a Catholic University promoting higher learning. And...why the hell are you referring to Saudi Arabia?Fwiw, I don't disagree with much of the actual point here - it is a private Catholic university after all, you can't expect it not to be Catholic. I just don't see why you need to purposely misstate the premise of an argument you could win just by stating it clearly.
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Private institution that never hid it's religious connection has no requirements to strip its walls to neutrality for anyone. I think we all agree with that correct?Wrong, the courts have in the past argued that since the school might be such a good school that getting a degree there is considered a step up, therefore it is discriminating to 'exclude' anyone for any reason.And Saudi Arabia, like many islam ruled countries, has laws against Christianity. It's a relevant point.The funny thing is this is all stuff that's been done in Europe, and the result is not more freedom for all, its just more islam freedom.And only VB will recognize this, you lefties are too busy laying your necks on the guillotine of political correctness to notice what you are doing.

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Private institution that never hid it's religious connection has no requirements to strip its walls to neutrality for anyone. I think we all agree with that correct?Wrong, the courts have in the past argued that since the school might be such a good school that getting a degree there is considered a step up, therefore it is discriminating to 'exclude' anyone for any reason.And Saudi Arabia, like many islam ruled countries, has laws against Christianity. It's a relevant point.The funny thing is this is all stuff that's been done in Europe, and the result is not more freedom for all, its just more islam freedom.And only VB will recognize this, you lefties are too busy laying your necks on the guillotine of political correctness to notice what you are doing.
I agree with the first point. If a private institution, with little or no public funding, wants to make very clear rules that are consistent with its purpose, then it should be able to go ahead. I have no idea why any non-fundamentalist would attend a school like BYU, but people seem to keep doing it.Like you said, lots of countries have laws against Christianity. Mentioning Saudi Arabia was irrelevant.I do like how you're now ending all your posts with a line made up of several quotes from your random Limbaugh phrase generator.
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I agree with the first point. If a private institution, with little or no public funding, wants to make very clear rules that are consistent with its purpose, then it should be able to go ahead. I have no idea why any non-fundamentalist would attend a school like BYU, but people seem to keep doing it.Like you said, lots of countries have laws against Christianity. Mentioning Saudi Arabia was irrelevant.I do like how you're now ending all your posts with a line made up of several quotes from your random Limbaugh phrase generator.
Marginalizing the messenger is a common trait of people with no argument of their own.
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Marginalizing the messenger is a common trait of people with no argument of their own.
You're right! Considering that came after several actual arguments, and in fact, contained an argument in itself, you are really on a hot streak of irrelevance today.
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You're right! Considering that came after several actual arguments, and in fact, contained an argument in itself, you are really on a hot streak of irrelevance today.
I am rubber you are glueI honestly think liberalism is a mental disorder. I am constantly amazed at how you can arrive at the conclusions you do from the same information.Maybe a shot of reality will cure you?They say a republican is just a democrat that was mugged.
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No, that's not what I said or implied. Try to focus, everybody else but you gets it.
I have trained my brain to follow logic, not feelings.Its hard for me to copy your side's politically correct feelings.So a group demands conditions from another group, but that is completely unrelated to the same group denying those same rights to the other group when they are in power?Yea, I still don't get it.
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So a group demands conditions from another group, but that is completely unrelated to the same group denying those same rights to the other group when they are in power?
Well, I'm not too surprised at your inability to understand the obvious and fundamental flaw in the sentence you wrote.Here's a hint though:The individuals lodging the complaint aren't members of the Saudi government, and the US judicial system is not made up of Christians living in Saudi Arabia. Does that help you understand how you used (abused) the word "group" in your sentence that I quoted?
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Well, I'm not too surprised at your inability to understand the obvious and fundamental flaw in the sentence you wrote.Here's a hint though:The individuals lodging the complaint aren't members of the Saudi government, and the US judicial system is not made up of Christians living in Saudi Arabia. Does that help you understand how you used (abused) the word "group" in your sentence that I quoted?
Ahh..I see. You are stuck in your misunderstanding.One of the groups in question, is in fact, in charge; it's a Catholic school.The group complaining is a tax exempt group with an identity that they are using as the reason for their complaint. They are not personally offended ( there is no legal basis for that ) they are offended as a group.So one group ( muslims ) are saying that it is a legally recognized group who's feelings and beliefs are a separate reality apart from them as individuals.The other group ( Catholics ) are in charge and make the rules with an iron fist because they have the legal right to.Now do you understand how the Saudi connection is a real example of the group's ( muslims ) hypocrisy? It's not an addition to the legal case, it's just an addition to the character of the group ( muslims ) who are arguing for their religious freedom.But it doesn't matter, the left can't turn over their freedoms fast enough to the muslim religion.
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Why are Muslims going to a Catholic school?
bg is pretty much never sincere in these discussions. there, I saved you all some time.
Quiet, you two, I'm working on my jab with this punching bag.
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I'm not convinced you even clicked on the original link.
I did, and I did so even though the original poster gave absolutely no summary of the link or indication of its contents.In terms of the link: I think the school has the right to have crosses in whatever rooms it wants, except for a dorm room.I'm not sure what the link means when it says they weren't allowed to form a Muslim student group. I don't think a school can discriminate against what groups are formed at that school based on religion.
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I think the school has the right to have crosses in whatever rooms it wants, except for a dorm room.I don't think a school can discriminate against what groups are formed at that school based on religion.
Why? We are still talking about a private school, right?"The complaint was filed by John Banzhaf, an attorney and professor at George Washington University Law School....Banzhaf said that it is technically not illegal for Catholic University to refuse to provide rooms devoid of religious icons."I think the university president offers a reasonable rebuttal:"'It’s just not something that we view as an activity that we want to sponsor because we’re a Catholic institution rather than Muslim,' he said."I mean, the whole thing is just weird to me. Why are you going to a Catholic school if you want to get away from Catholic symbols?
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I mean, the whole thing is just weird to me. Why are you going to a Catholic school if you want to get away from Catholic symbols?
For the same reasons liberals live in the freest country in the history of the world, but want to turn over all that freedom to islam to show everyone who isn't watching how open minded they are?
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Why? We are still talking about a private school, right?"The complaint was filed by John Banzhaf, an attorney and professor at George Washington University Law School....Banzhaf said that it is technically not illegal for Catholic University to refuse to provide rooms devoid of religious icons."I think the university president offers a reasonable rebuttal:"'It’s just not something that we view as an activity that we want to sponsor because we’re a Catholic institution rather than Muslim,' he said."I mean, the whole thing is just weird to me. Why are you going to a Catholic school if you want to get away from Catholic symbols?
I'm not sure which part you're disagreeing with, if you are at all.I think the school has the right to decorate their rooms however they want. I don't think this extends to, say, a dorm room because that's a residence, and I don't think rentors should be allowed to force their tenants to decorate a room with religious objects.Having said that, there are many good schools that are religious, and one may go for the education, not the religion. But, that's a choice, and one should understand the consequences of such a choice. They should be allowed to form a "muslim group", whatever that means, but the school doesn't have to provide them with rooms or food or whatever in accordance with that group's wishes. (On the other hand, they can't deny them things that other groups are allowed).I think that summarizes my position.
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