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The guy's going to die a painful death from pancreatic cancer. Nothing's going to stop that. If he's in jail at the time or elsewhere, it doesn't really matter. His sentence has been given down by god. It is final, and no one can take that back.I find the notion of giving this man unspeakable compassion to be quite touching. His being or not being in jail for a few months isn't going to bring anyone back, isn't going to make terrorists more or less likely to commit their atrocities, it isn't going to make things "right" in any way. It only shows that people are capable of turning the other cheek, of showing not forgiveness, for his actions will never be forgiven, but human decency, even in the face of the greatest evil. I also find it deeply hypocritical for any Christian to question the release of this prisoner. Releasing this man is basically the central tenet of Christ's teachings.
I think that it would make terrorists more likely to commit their atrocities. They may now think that they will get away with these acts. It definately will not be a deterent.Check out this article from the National Post here cliff notes: 1. Maybe it was the wrong man or 2. Maybe a deal was made.
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The guy's going to die a painful death from pancreatic cancer. Nothing's going to stop that. If he's in jail at the time or elsewhere, it doesn't really matter. His sentence has been given down by

Reasonable comparison.

fair enough (but it wasn't actually the same laws. there are laws in my country that i disagree with, and those that i agree with. it is misleading to group them all together). I think it was a morally correct decision. revenge should not be a factor, especially on someone who is terminally ill. he's as good as dead, letting him out shows compassion.
I hope they show the same compassion to Charles Manson
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I think that it would make terrorists more likely to commit their atrocities. They may now think that they will get away with these acts. It definately will not be a deterent.
Terrorists rarely think about consequences when planning attacks. It's not like there are people who are on the edge of being a terrorist and the think, "Well, if I get cancer and I get arrested in Scotland, I may get released, though probably not now after there's so much controversy. Whatever, I'll go with this whole 'terrrorist' thing."They're far too beyond logic and reason at that point to be swayed.
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English Al-Jazeerathere are also issues with how this guy was convicted. he was put away mainly on hearsay:I am sure there isn't a biased swing to that. I understand they are an international news company but they are also the ones who air the threats from these jack@sses in the first place so those references probably aren't worth the effort to click them.There is no reason in my mind for this guy to get released to be given a hero's welcome. I don't care how sick he is or was and I hope he just goes back to die and isn't going to strap on a ballistic backpack and earn himself some virgins.
Just so you know, Al Jazeera are one of the best news desks out there. They actually cover world issues in a pretty unbiased manner and are essentially the old BBC World middle east office. Some of their stuff will show bias but it is usually from opinion pieces and it will be one of the guests sprouting that nonsense. It is no different from Fox in the US throwing on a right winger to discuss the new health care bill or Sky News bringing on a Tory think tank leader to bash Brown.As for the prisoner release, there is clearly more political motives at work here, and why not. They aren't going to get this guy in prison for a longer time before he dies so they may as well get something from him that can benefit the lives of citizens.
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Just so you know, Al Jazeera are one of the best news desks out there. They actually cover world issues in a pretty unbiased manner and are essentially the old BBC World middle east office. Some of their stuff will show bias but it is usually from opinion pieces and it will be one of the guests sprouting that nonsense. It is no different from Fox in the US throwing on a right winger to discuss the new health care bill or Sky News bringing on a Tory think tank leader to bash Brown.
Dave Marash might disagree
As for the prisoner release, there is clearly more political motives at work here, and why not. They aren't going to get this guy in prison for a longer time before he dies so they may as well get something from him that can benefit the lives of citizens.
Yeah. Why not just politicize the Justice system so people know for certain Justice isn't "blind"?To hell with Victims and their sense of fairness, it isn't about them anyway.I mean, a sweetheart Oil Deal with Libya is worth more than Justice any day.
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Just so you know, Al Jazeera are one of the best news desks out there. They actually cover world issues in a pretty unbiased manner and are essentially the old BBC World middle east office. Some of their stuff will show bias but it is usually from opinion pieces and it will be one of the guests sprouting that nonsense. It is no different from Fox in the US throwing on a right winger to discuss the new health care bill or Sky News bringing on a Tory think tank leader to bash Brown.As for the prisoner release, there is clearly more political motives at work here, and why not. They aren't going to get this guy in prison for a longer time before he dies so they may as well get something from him that can benefit the lives of citizens.
Highly probable.
QUOTE (sKIjaKuDa @ Tuesday, August 25th, 2009, 2:37 PM) post_snapback.gifEnglish Al-Jazeerathere are also issues with how this guy was convicted. he was put away mainly on hearsay:
Since most people don't click the links (from the National Post article here):POSSIBILITY 2: THE WRONG MANFor years, many well-informed people in the intelligence community have doubted al-Megrahi's guilt in the Lockerbie bombing. They have argued that the bombing was the work of a Syrian based Palestinian group, the PFLP-GC, working for the government of Iran.Among those who support the Iran-did-it theory are: (i) former Israeli prime minister Ariel Sharon; (ii) Robert Baer, the CIA official who worked directly on the Lockerbie case; (iii) Hans Koechler, the UN Security Council observer at al-Megrahi's trial; (iv) Robert Black, the Scottish lawyer who organized the trial proceedings; (v) Dr. Jim Swire, the spokesman for the families of British Lockerbie victims who lost his own daughter aboard Pan Am Flight 103; and (vi) David Horovitz, editor of the Jerusalem Post.The U. S. and U. K. publicly identified Libya as the guilty party in 1990. Why might Britain and the U. S. prefer to assert Libyan rather than Iranian and Syrian culpability at that time? Could it have been a thank you to Syria for joining the U. S.-U. K. Gulf War coalition against Iraq? Or was it simply less embarrassing this way? Five months before Lockerbie, a U. S. warship, the Vincennes, had mistakenly fired a missile at an Iranian passenger jet, killing 290 people. If Iran downed Pan Am 103, some might cite the Vincennes incident as justification or excuse.Question: Could it be that Hillary Clinton has come to believe the "wrong man" thesis? Here's what she had to say in a televised interview with the BBC on the eve of al-Megrahi's release:"I just think it is absolutely wrong to release someone who has been imprisoned based on the evidence about his involvement in such a horrendous crime." (Italics added.)That does not sound like ringing certainty about the man's guilt, does it?Doubts about al-Megrahi's guilt might explain the limpness of the Obama/Clinton statements about his early release. But such doubts would not excuse that limpness. If al-Megrahi is the wrong man, then there has been a miscarriage of justice. In that situation, al-Megrahi would deserve much more than release and a few quietly murmured words of "disappointment": He would deserve pardon, apology and compensation.But if al-Megrahi is the right man, then what has just happened in Scotland is an appalling outrage -- and the Obama administration's mealy-mouthed response to that outrage is a disgrace.©David Frumdfrum@aei.org
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If it's true, I think the real culrit here is Libya. Once again we see why that having control of oil in the hands of extremist who will hold it hostage is a bad thing.I bet they never tried to hold the oil hostage with the US when George W. Bush was in office.
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If it's true, I think the real culrit here is Libya. Once again we see why that having control of oil in the hands of extremist who will hold it hostage is a bad thing.I bet they never tried to hold the oil hostage with the US when George W. Bush was in office.
The bottom line is that the West simply has to pour all its efforts into alternative energy. Then we can leave the Middle East lands and all their politics behind.I won't pretend to know which source is viable long-term; it may be an ongoing project, it may be new, but it is one of the issues which the West simply has to resolve for the future...
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The bottom line is that the West simply has to pour all its efforts into alternative energy. Then we can leave the Middle East lands and all their politics behind.I won't pretend to know which source is viable long-term; it may be an ongoing project, it may be new, but it is one of the issues which the West simply has to resolve for the future...
I agree however it reminds of the old boys automotive group where they won't change until they are on the precipice of a financial abyss. As long as there is money to be had they will do anything to have it even if it is to the detriment of others. Where is the Toyoto of oil?
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Susan Atkins doesn't have any oil...http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/09/03/califo...kins/index.html

(CNN) -- Former "Manson Family" member Susan Atkins, who stabbed actress Sharon Tate to death more than 40 years ago and now is terminally ill, was denied parole Wednesday, prison officials said. The parole hearing was the 13th for Atkins, 61, who is battling terminal brain cancer. Held at the Central California Women's Facility in Chowchilla, California, the hearing stretched to more than nine hours.The panel set another hearing for Atkins in three years, said Michele Kane, spokeswoman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.Atkins was 21 when she and other followers of Charles Manson participated in a two-night rampage that left seven people dead and terrorized the city of Los Angeles in August 1969. She and the others -- Manson, Leslie Van Houten, Patricia Krenwinkel and Charles "Tex" Watson -- were initially sentenced to death in the slayings of five people, including Tate, and two additional deaths the following night.Their sentences were automatically commuted to life in prison when the Supreme Court struck down the nation's death penalty laws in 1972. By her own admission, Atkins, known as Sadie Mae Glutz within the Manson family, held Tate down as she pleaded for mercy, and stabbed the actress 16 times. Tate was eight months pregnant. In a 1993 parole board hearing, Atkins said Tate "asked me to let her baby live. ... I told her I didn't have any mercy on her."After killing Tate, according to historical accounts of the slayings, Atkins scrawled the word "pig" in blood on the door of the home Tate shared with her husband, director Roman Polanski. Polanski was not home, but three of Tate's house guests were also slain by the killers, as was a teenager who was visiting the home's caretaker in his nearby cottage.In an interview scheduled to air Friday on CNN's "Larry King Live," Linda Kasabian, a former Manson follower who was the prosecution's star witness against Manson and Atkins, recounted the Tate slayings. "I started hearing like horrible screaming and I started running toward the house and Sadie came running out and I just looked at her and I said, 'Sadie, please make it stop,'" Kasabian said. "And she said, 'I can't. It's too late.' ... It was unreal. It was so real that it was unreal."On whether she asked Atkins and the others why they were killing, Kasabian said, "It wasn't that kind of a scenario. All that I said was, 'Sadie, make it stop.'"For her safety, Kasabian asked to wear a disguise during the interview, which was conducted last month.As of earlier this year, Atkins was paralyzed over 85 percent of her body and could not sit up in bed or be moved into a wheelchair, according to a Web site maintained by her husband and attorney, James Whitehouse. She has been described as a model prisoner who has accepted responsibility for her role in the slayings and now shuns Manson.But Tate's sister, Debra Tate, told CNN in an e-mail in March that she does not think any Manson family member convicted of murder should ever be set free, saying the slayings were "so vicious, so inhumane, so depraved, that there is no turning back.""The 'Manson Family' murderers are sociopaths, and from that, they can never be rehabilitated," Tate said. "They should all stay right where they are -- in prison -- until they die. There will never be true justice for my sister Sharon and the other victims of the 'Manson Family.' Keeping the murderers in prison is the least we, as a society who values justice, can do."In a manuscript posted on her Web site, Atkins wrote that "this is the past I have to live with, and I have to live with it every day.""Unlike the reader, or the people who seem to think Charles Manson was cool, I can't think about it for an hour or so and then go on with my life. Just like the families and friends of the victims, this is with me every day. I have to wake up every day with this and, no matter what I do for the rest of my life and no matter how much I give back to the community, I will never be able to replace what my crime took away. And that's not 'neat,' and that's not 'cool.'"Atkins' brain cancer was diagnosed in March 2008, Whitehouse wrote on his Web site. On May 15, doctors predicted she would live less than six months. But she passed that deadline, he wrote, and celebrated her 21st wedding anniversary on December 7.
What kind of guy marries a monster like this in Prison?
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The bottom line is that the West simply has to pour all its efforts into alternative energy. Then we can leave the Middle East lands and all their politics behind.I won't pretend to know which source is viable long-term; it may be an ongoing project, it may be new, but it is one of the issues which the West simply has to resolve for the future...
If alternative energy was economically feasible, we'd be doing it. Costs are coming down but they're obviously still too high to be considered as a full alternate to fossil fuels.You can't beat the cost of coal, and we'll be in the middle east for years to come.
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-12...bie-bomber.htmlBritish officials claim Mr Obama and Mrs Clinton were kept informed at all stages of discussions concerning Megrahi’s return. The officials say the Americans spoke out because they were taken aback by the row over Megrahi’s release, not because they did not know it was about to happen.‘The US was kept fully in touch about everything that was going on with regard to Britain’s discussions with Libya in recent years and about Megrahi,’ said the Whitehall aide. ‘We would never do anything about Lockerbie without discussing it with the US. It is disingenuous of them to act as though Megrahi’s return was out of the blue. 'They knew about our prisoner transfer agreement with Libya and they knew that the Scots were considering Megrahi’s case.’
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  • 8 months later...

I was hoping this was an epic, but misplaced, Beans story. Imagine my disappointment.

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So, are you still not drinking Scotch?
I haven't had a Scotch since before my pledge. Truth be known, I sort of forgot about this - really haven't had a "Scotch Opportunity" for a while. I was in London for about a month earlier in the year and drank plenty of local beer.The reason I thought of this was because we had a couple over for drinks prior to going out for dinner yesterday. I knew one of them is a Scotch Drinker and the other Vodka & Tonic (Ugh). I realized I didn't have any decent Vodka, so I went to the store to restock. While there I thought briefly about getting a good bottle of Scotch, perhaps a nice Maccallan. I knew that the only Single Malt that I have in stock is a nearly full bottle of Glenfiddich Special Reserve. I thought it might be nice to have a choice - and then I remembered this story and decided to stick with the Glenfiddich. In addition to the Liquor, I did buy a couple of bottles of decent wine, including a French Bordeaux. France used to be in my "no buy zone".
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Well, I'm glad that there's somewhat of a statute of limitations on this stuff. I mean, if you're not going to drink Scotch or French Wine, I don't know what the point of living is.

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Well, I'm glad that there's somewhat of a statute of limitations on this stuff. I mean, if you're not going to drink Scotch or French Wine, I don't know what the point of living is.
if anyone is suffering from long-term liquor boycotts, it has to be germany or russia, right?
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Still not buying Scotch. Just went thru Duty Free and avoided the temptation....and no more BP for me. Oil spill didn't do it, but this does.

BP confirmed on Thursday it had lobbied the British government in late 2007 over a Prisoner Transfer Agreement with Libya because it was concerned a slow resolution would impact an offshore drilling deal with Libya.http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100715/ts_nm/us_bp_libya_1
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