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He's colder than that, now.

When DFW died, Chorozzo made a disrespectful comment, and I slowly willed him into the grave over it. I didn't love Prince less than I loved DFW.

jesus would somebody fucking just die already so we can get a break in the music snobbery here?

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I think that there has to be some serious underlying mental disease for someone to react that way (suicide or shooting spree) to being terminated. So yeah, it's traumatic and can be horrible if done poorly, but it's hard to blame employers for all of those instances in which a person near the edge snapped due to a regular part of having a job. Though I'm sure there are extreme instances of employers driving someone insane.
Really? I totally disagree.I do agree that people are responsible for their own actions and murder can never be "blamed on the employer". However, depression and hopelessness can make you totally irrational, and many effects could be dampened and mitigated by dealing with employees gently, as Scram suggested.
Depression IS a serious mental disease.
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Depression IS a serious mental disease.
"Depression" is not a disease, it's almost always scientifically labeled a disorder, unless you get into a very very specific diagnosis. Speedz knows. He's going to have to prescribe tons of very expensive medications for doggie depression, because "Champ" looks sad today. *wink*
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"Depression" is not a disease, it's almost always scientifically labeled a disorder, unless you get into a very very specific diagnosis. Speedz knows. He's going to have to prescribe tons of very expensive medications for doggie depression, because "Champ" looks sad today. *wink*
Depression is just as much a disease as diabetes.
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Depression is just as much a disease as diabetes.
Sometimes, but not always. Sometimes it really is less of a medical disease and more of a psychological disorder. It really depends on the case, from what I understand.So, to make everyone happy, you're both wrong.
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So, to make everyone happy, you're both wrong.
I'm going to disagree with you here, since you're saying the exact same thing I just did.
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I'm going to disagree with you here, since you're saying the exact same thing I just did.
I'm going to disagree with your disagreement.
"Depression" is not a disease, it's almost always scientifically labeled a disorder
Sometimes it really is less of a medical disease and more of a psychological disorder. It really depends on the case, from what I understand.
"Almost always" [does not equal] "Sometimes".
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"Almost always" [does not equal] "Sometimes".
I'm just assuming that you misspoke.
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Depression is just as much a disease as diabetes.
Heh. Seriously though, in many cases depression absolutely is an illness stemming from very measurable changes in brain chemistry.
I agree with brv on this one. There has been a PR push to call it a disease in recent years, which I can only assume comes from the pharmaceutical companies. I think it's a terrible misnomer. Regarding speedz' comment, while depression is probably always associated with changes in brain chemistry, that does not at all mean it is caused by changes in brain chemistry. Being angry also changes your brain chemistry. To psychologists it is officially "Major Depressive Disorder", which is classified as a mood disorder.
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Regarding speedz' comment, while depression is probably always associated with changes in brain chemistry, that does not at all mean it is caused by changes in brain chemistry. Being angry also changes your brain chemistry.
You don't think depression can be caused by changes in brain chemistry?
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You don't think depression can be caused by changes in brain chemistry?
I think its hard to talk about cause and effect when it comes to mental events. Thoughts are ultimately electrochemical events. For instance, thinking about really sad things can decrease your serotonin levels... you look at a depressed person's brain and find decreased serotonin... did it cause the depression? Sure, people can vary in their brain chemistry to begin with and that can be a factor, but I think the public idea that depression is the result of a "chemical imbalance" is largely the result of deliberate propaganda by Pharma. The best way to cure depression is by changing your thought process and behavior -- cognitive behavioral therapy. I'm not saying people should never take drugs for depression, or that there are no genetic or uncontrollable biological factors that predispose you, but I think its a mistake to draw the conclusion that because there are neurochemical or neurostructural changes associated with depression that it is caused by something on that level and should be treated on that level.edit: one of my main problems with the disease view is that it tells people that they are "victims" of their depression, which implies that they have no responsibility in making it go away. I think this is a dangerous point of view, especially given that depression is characterized by feelings of loss of control. thinking of yourself as a victim can be part of the problem instead of part of the solution.
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in college, i answered a question about depression with this flow chart:Edit: [removed because it was annoyingly big] [beck's cognitive triad flow chart - google it]i did not recieve full credit for that question.

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