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Rocketwadster

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Everything posted by Rocketwadster

  1. I'm not disagreeing with a lot of what people have said regarding the 4-5x bb, but please explain how that would have helped me in those tourneys? I ended up with basically all of my chips in the pot, with the best hand pre-flop, and lost. All that would have happened had I raised a lesser amount pre-flop would be that someone else raised me, or more people would have limped in. Either way, my money wtill would have went into the middle before the last cards came out. Therefore, there is no fault in how I played them pre-flop. The hand where i folded on the river may have been a bad play
  2. unless i misread, your post, you folded on the river to a single bet in one of the hands. I think a re-raise here would be a good idea. There was no flush available. Your opponent could have had anything (ie. ace king like you, ace queen, etc). You checked on the turn, as did your opponent. Your check told him that you haven't hit your hand, so he may have been tacking a stab at the pot. By raising his bet on the river, he will do one of three things, fold=you win, call=you win or you lose, re-raise=you fold. As for the other hands, I think you played them fine. With limit hold-em, at
  3. The first tourney was a typo, I had 2000 chips.FYI - In these Multi's, the buy-in is pretty small ($10, $5, and $2.50), so every time I put in 5 or 6 times the BB, I get a ton of callers. The larger pre-flop bet is to hopefuly eliminate the drawing hands (ie. 8 9 suited), so I am only up against pockets or ace X. I have read many a book, but they are more for the higher stakes games and tourneys. With these low buy-ins, people with more money than brains call with just about anything. Just this Saturday (after my post), I got called on my all-in (pocket fives) to queen 4 offsuit, and of co
  4. Unless you are just killing time, playing at stakes this low will not help you improve your play, nor will it do anything (good or bad) to your bankroll. There will be too many people calling with anything when playing Omaha Hi/Lo at stakes this small. Even on the $0.25/0.50 tables, it amazes me some of the hands you see at the end where it was two and three bet each round. If you want to improve your play, and possibly your bankroll, you need to start at $0.50/$1, which should weed out the majority of the savages. I've dabbled as high as $2/4, but the fluctuations to my limited bankroll s
  5. I played in three NL Hold-em Multi's this morning (all had over 600 players). Here is what happened in each of them.First tourney - blinds are still low (I think it was 15-30), I have 200 chips (from 800 to start). Get pocket kings in middle position. One limper before me, I raised $500 (which is over 16 times the big blind), next guy calls, guy after him re-raises another $100 (what a weak play that was), every folds to me, I go all in, first caller to my raise goes all-in also (less chips than me), re-raiser calls (more chips than me). Ends up the callers had Ace seven offsuit and pocket
  6. The old saying for Omaha goes something along the lines of "If it can happen, it will" when considering Omaha hands. Meaning something like if you have the second best possible hand, someone has the best possible hand. Playing only high hands in the long run is a no-no in my opinion. The same does not hold true for playing only low hands though, as many a low hand turns into a straight and/or a flush very quickly, plus the fact that your low hands that turn into flushes will mainly include your ace, giving you the nut flush.Omaha Hi-Lo is a wild and crazy game, which I love. I think it is
  7. I am curious how you have also managed to avoid so many bad beats over your tournament schedule. I've had just about every bad beat you can imagine, plus some you cannot fathom (ie. all-in (their money not mine) pre-flop with pocket kings losing to Q 6 offsuit when they made trip sixes, all-in pre-flop (both our money) with pocket aces losing to a J 7 suited when they made a straight not the flush). :evil: 20 minutes after I posted my first response to your article, my all-in with pocket queens got busted by pocket 7's when he made a set (when we were down to 63 players from 800, with only
  8. The article was okay if not a little simple for my liking. To me, it seems like you have simple re-hashed the opinion of many poker pro's from their books on how to survive and thrive at a Multi-Table tournament. It would be nice to see some new information or theories in your article(s). Specific examples of what to do in certain situations at exact moments of the Multi-table tourneys would be helpful. You have indicated that you have won two of these tournaments, so how about giving us some key hands that came up during these wins, so we can get a better idea of how to get there ourselve
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