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Merby

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Everything posted by Merby

  1. I didn't need to read any further. You are playing above your bankroll. I strongly urge you to consider playing 1/2 NLHE with only $3000 (in fact, I consider $3,000 a minimum bankroll at 1/2) Buy-in for the maximum, and you won't be put to the test as to when you should leave.Any time the amount of money at the table starts affecting your decision, it's a sign you're playing with too large a portion of your bankroll. I recommend getting up and leaving at this point (you have booked a nice win, anyway...) You are not playing at your optimum, and even if there are great fish at your table,
  2. Here's a case where he figured he had the best hand and decided to deal a knockout blow. Since you were interested in doing the betting, he just waited until you felt committed.Congratulations on second-- a good accomplishement on its own!Cheers,Merby
  3. Because nothing can beat an overpair on a monotone board.
  4. True... as I think there is little doubt in everyone's mind that he is gritting his teeth and calling the river if a blank falls.
  5. ...It just so happens that DrawingDead happens to post more (way more) than even the semi-regular posters. The fact is, he has been holding this forum together...I am glad that there are some of us out here who help him shoulder the load.Cheers, DrawingDead, cheers.Merby
  6. Actually, the river allowed him to bust the villian. The villian had obviously put our hero on a Q, so he is not committing to the pot... until he thinks the river will scare the hero out of the pot.I guarentee, if a K does not come on the river, the villian is not pushing all-in... I'm not saying he folds (he may call you down regardless...) but he is playing as a person who thinks he is probably behind, and can only beat a bluff.Cheers,Merby
  7. Yeah, it's never a bad play in this situation to get all the money in as the favourite. Nevertheless, DrawingDeadInDM's story shows why (for a good player), sometimes smooth-calling preflop can reap great rewards later on in the hand.Cheers,Merby
  8. I had a big score back in September. The first thing I did was scan the financial pages on the net and in the newspaper, trying to get an idea of what the experts thought was going to happen to the Canadien dollar. At the time, the dollar had skyrocketed to 85 cents US, and was forcast to keep climbing. With all the hurricanes threatening the US oil interests in Texas, there was a concensus at the time that the dollar would keep going up.This was very importent to me because a 1 cent change in the value of the canadian dollar would have resulted in close to a $200 difference in my cash-out
  9. I don't know, I like the smooth-call on the flop. At these limits, most draws will stick around even when not priced to call. I like the idea of occasionally smooth-calling the flop then getting aggressive on the turn. This way, you only give them one draw to their flush/straight. Plus, if it comes on the turn, you can let their action dictate your action..<edit> I just noticed you're in the SB. For some reason, when I read this, I thought you were on the button. In that case I go for: 1) 1/2 pot bet, looking to reraise. (If you are just called, you push allin to any blank turn)
  10. Yeah, I considered deleting my second post, but I was laughing too hard: I will stand by all my donk plays and posts -- the entertainment value of my stupidity alone is well worth any bruised ego!...and my ego could use a good bruisiing now and then...Cheers,Merby
  11. If our hero is certain villian doesn't have AA and that villian is willing to commit all his chips pre-flop, then pushing all-in gets the money in the pot when the hero is a big favourite.BUTIf the hero has such a good read on the villian, I suspect he can outplay the villian post-flop. Hence simply calling pre-flop gives the hero the oppertunity to either a) Bust the villian or B) get away from the hand cheaply if the villian catches up.I think the pre-flop all-in move is best unless you have a great read on the villian and can control the villian's betting patterns. Personally, I'm not
  12. I see this move all the time at 1/2 NLHE (live). The play (almost) never works as the bluffer failed to set up the bluff on earlier streets.My advice: Don't try this against strong opponents!This play just reaks "bluff". They will call you down if they have a piece of the board, and if they can't call, they may just go ahead and raise!On the other hand, if you are against a solid player who you know has a made hand (not on the draw), then you could set yourself up to win a big pot by check/calling the flop and turn (so he puts you on the flush draw), and then overbetting the river when the
  13. The irony of accidentally quoting my above post (given its content) is delicious. The best part is: it was a total accident (talk about a donk play!)Ofcourse, had I thought of this joke, I wouldn't have hesitated to quote my own post for added irony... I just wish I could claim that it wasn't an accident...Cheers!Merby (the donk self-quoter)
  14. This hand boils down to whether or not you raise this preflop.If you feel comfortable playing the hand out of position against this player, then re-raise, it'll probably need to be a substantial raise, and then followed up by leading out with a large bet/check raise on the flop.I don't know that I dislike the way you played it. But, yes, he did play his hand like a complete jack ass.This post boils down to whether or not you post this once or twice. Me, I go for the single post: it gets the point across without repeating myself.Other people may argue that there is merit in the double (or even
  15. This hand boils down to whether or not you raise this preflop.If you feel comfortable playing the hand out of position against this player, then re-raise, it'll probably need to be a substantial raise, and then followed up by leading out with a large bet/check raise on the flop.I don't know that I dislike the way you played it. But, yes, he did play his hand like a complete jack ass.This post boils down to whether or not you post this once or twice. Me, I go for the single post: it gets the point across without repeating myself.Other people may argue that there is merit in the double (or even
  16. There are a lot of different ways to play this hand... it just so happens that all of them are worse than the way chosen by our hero. The hero did all he could to put all his money in with the best hand, and just happened to get outdrawn.Oh... and if you even think of folding to the flop raise, well that's as stupid as trying to overbet the pot in a pot limit hold'em tournement.Cheers,Merby
  17. Aahhh... but it works both ways. There is little I find more satisfying than raking in a $1,000 pot because some opponent with AA was blind to the possibility that he is beat on a flop of J 8 3 rainbow... only to see at the river that his pre-flop raise and our relative stack sizes priced my 88 to call.If you play a hand with the second nuts always afraid that you are up against the nuts, then I agree, limit will probably better suited to your play. Yes, you will lose some hands with under-set versus over-set (for example), and yes, it sucks, but far more often, you in fact have the best han
  18. If you haven't signed up an account with the FCP poker room, then you still can get in. When you sign-up, make sure you enter the charter member bonus code (I think it was 35007). After that, you're set (it should now say "Charter Member" on your "My Account" page).If you have signed up for FCP poker already, you have to go through a few more steps:1) close your current account (don't forget to cashout!)2) wait the 30-day roll-over period.3) reopen your account using the same email address as before. Your username must be your previous username, but you must add a "FCP0" (that's FCP<zero
  19. 1) I bet out here roughly 80 percent of the time. If you always try to take the pot down, your opposition may get wind... Bet often enough to make a profit with the pots you take down here, but infrequently enough to always keep them guessing...2) This boils down to a read on your opponent.--> The weaker the opponent, the more likely I am to simply call pre-flop with the idea that I can outplay them post-flop for +EV.--> The more aggressive the opponents, the more likely I reraise (or fold) here. If your opponent is aggressive, then it is likely you have him beat here: come over the t
  20. Quiet! Don't give them a chance to catch on to our game, Drawing. Don't forget our ultimate goal with this forum...Cheers,Merby
  21. You guys got it all wrong. Both hands demonstrate players who are students of the Farrell school of thought.Semester 1: Open Farrelling Folding first can be fun. Learn how to beat your opponent to the muck!Semester 2: Investing in a fold to improve table image: (shown in the above hands)Semester 3: Folding the nuts: The ultimate slow-play: your opponent will never suspect the strength of your hand with this move!Cheers,MErby
  22. ... But he was just following the advice in your signature block... (sw)Cheers,Merby
  23. It's true, that knowing the outcome is irrelevant to this discussion, but... it's nice to hear the result. Otherwise it's like reading a book only to find out the last chapter is missing -- kind of frustrating.Cheers,Merby
  24. The portions in bold list the key reasons I fold to his check-raise. It's live, so I would also laugh while folding: make him think you had junk! Then play tight for the next little while and get paid off. You have established a loose and aggressive image, I think it is time to punctuate the point by making the table think you play any two cards. Perhaps ask if your "queen high" was good enough, show the queen while sliding he ace into the muck.Doing the above will set you up to have your *solid* hands get paid off for the rest of the night. You have become predictably LAG: the opponent k
  25. Let's replay the hand omitting callers for now: UTG raises min (to $1) Button reraises min (to $1.50) UTG reraises to $8 2nd position calls all-in (I added this call, because it shows commitmant to his holdings...)I say EVEN if you think UTG is loose and aggressive, there is a high probability you are against an over pair. If not, you are against at least two opponents, so there are 3 or 4 ranks aboveyour fives which will pair up your opponent.Bottom line, if I were you, I would think the only way I win this hand is by setting up (ignoring straights and flushes for now... you can't flop
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